Results tagged “Harvard Business School”


GE's Innovation Czar On Startup Qualities | Beth Comstock | WSJ Startup of the Year [Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJRkSnMy-mQ]

Innovation is driving the marketplace like never before. So many of us have come to the conclusion that to build an effective organization, we must all think and act like a 20-something entrepreneur who works out of his parents' garage.

There's no denying that young innovators who are fresh out of college will deliver plenty of market-changing products in the next decade. But what about the rest of us? The lion's share of the global economy consists of people who work at large enterprises with distinct corporate cultures and well-defined hierarchies. Too often we're led to believe that we have to throw off the trappings of the large organization in order to innovate like a start-up.

It turns out that the opposite is true. That is, the young entrepreneur who's looking to build tomorrow's enterprise from a drafty garage should be taking cues from established organizations. That's because every effective (and, ultimately, successful) start-up is the result of the right mix of messy innovation and defined, disciplined business processes.

How to Look Around Corners


Clayton Christensen on How Will You Measure Your Life 

Read Clayton Christensen's How Will You Measure Your Life? yet? After the wild success of his book The Innovator's Dilemma in the late 1990s, this Harvard Business School professor seems to have delivered another hit because the author once again requires the reader to make some tough decisions about how one relates to one's surroundings.

I came across a recent interview with Christensen in which the professor discusses making life decisions based on full value rather than marginal value. What does he mean by this distinction? For example, making a decision based on expediency is often based on the assumption that you will pay a small, marginal cost. But Christensen warns that in the end, you always end up paying up for expenses you never thought you would have to face. "This goes on in your personal life just as much as it does when you invest in setting up a sales force," he says in the interview.

Just how Sustainable is your culture of Innovation?

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Passion. It's a word we throw around quite frequently in the business world. I often hear friends say they are passionate about their job or about their career. 
 
But, I think, we often confuse passion with ambition. Think about the people you've come across over the course of your life who were solely focused on getting that next promotion. According to Bill George, a professor at Harvard Business School, that kind of attitude displays ambition but not necessarily passion. Prof. George, who teaches leadership at Harvard and had a distinguished career leading Medtronic, recently spoke to the Infosys Executive Leadership Summit. "If your passion is to get a promotion, you'll never innovate," he said to the crowd. "If your passion is to get a promotion, you'll probably make a lot of money, but you are not likely be the innovator. If you innovate you deserve to make a lot of money and you will, but if you start out with the goal of getting promoted, you will not be the innovator."

It takes an Innovator to lead a culture of Innovation

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Harvard Business School professor Bill George speaks at the Infosys Executive Leadership Summit.

Bill George teaches leadership at Harvard Business School. Imagine my delight when he announced to at the recently convened Infosys Executive Leadership Forum that one of the first cases he ever wrote at Harvard was about Narayana Murthy, the founder of Infosys.

Mr. Murthy's achievements are well known to those of us who have worked for the company he founded. Beginning in 1983 and with just $250 in his pocket, Narayana Murthy would build a global corporation within one generation. The rapid rise and initial success of Infosys came from Mr. Murthy's invention of the Global Delivery Model, now the gold standard throughout the services industry. His accomplishments also helped pioneer what has become a formidable economic force: the Indian technology industry. Just why did Bill George decide to write one of his first business school cases about Mr. Murthy? Because the Harvard professor says he's astounded at just how many large corporations lack the kind of senior executives that Mr. Murthy had when he was building Infosys. That is to say, Mr. Murthy recognized the importance of making sure his corporate leaders were innovators at heart. Why, asked Prof. George, do so many large companies, with all their resources and access to talent, fail to innovate? And why aren't their top people natural innovators?

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