Results tagged “health”

Protecting Patient Health Information - A Hard Look

Protecting Patient Health Information with the 'Zero Trust Model'

In the recent past, information systems in healthcare organizations have become vulnerable to hacking. This in turn is making patient data susceptible to misuse. A study in 2016, pegged the cost of data breaches in the healthcare industry at $6.2Bn . While some of these were small, the major ones affected millions of people. As in the case of Banner Health, one of the largest nonprofit health systems in the US, which suffered a data breach in 2016 that compromised the details of 3.7 million patients. Hackers gained access to the organization's data through the point of sale (PoS) system.

A reason why healthcare organizations have become soft targets for hackers is because they store a large amount of sensitive customer data. Usually this data is stored in a single database. So when hackers gain access, they access the entire cache. This personally identifiable and health-related information is also valuable to organizations in a number of other industries. In this blog post, I highlight areas that make healthcare organizations vulnerable to hackers and discuss possible ways to address the problem.

Are we at the threshold of the 'age of automation' in Healthcare?

Are we at the threshold of the 'age of automation' in Healthcare?

Purposeful automation and artificial intelligence are not only revolutionizing the relationship between doctor and patient, they are also transforming the way all kinds of processes - from medical imaging to surgery - take place. For instance, I was amazed to read recently that scientists had discovered 97 new areas of the brain. This, even though mapping the human brain has been a 100-year quest in the field of neuroscience. How did the major new discovery happen? Don't be surprised, but this was achieved by using automation and machine learning to map the brain's cerebral cortex.

The latest findings will, according to the academic paper's authors, "enable substantially improved neuroanatomical precision for studies of the structural and functional organization of human cerebral cortex and its variation across individuals and in development, aging, and disease." Simply put, unlocking the brain means unlocking potential cures to many elusive and deadly conditions and diseases. Or at the very least, doctors will be able to determine how certain neurological disorders occur in the first place.

Startups Start Up Insurance



Elevator Pitch: An simple way to pick insurance? [Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KwUlCzN4-Aw]

While the foundation of insurance and what it stands for - protection of life and belongings - cannot and has not changed, the way it is managed and provided, can and should. Driving this change are a new breed of startups that are doing some exciting things in this space. With the integration of technology in insurance, many new areas like online policy comparison and insurance on demand have opened up and are on the rise. Large insurance behemoths are often unable to make their way into these areas as they lack agility and resources, leaving a lacuna that must be filled. For startups, this gap is an opportunity to make their presence felt in a multi-trillion dollar industry.

But what gives startups in the insurance sector the edge to do this? Firstly, they have the flexibility that large insurers lack. With the right digital tools, startups can quickly adapt and accommodate changes as and when they are needed. Next, investors are realizing the potential of startups and are ready to invest big bucks. According to CB Insights, in 2010, US$ 2.12 billion was raised by companies looking to invest in insurance startups. Of this, US$ 1.39 billion was paid out since 2014. This shows that there is no dearth of funding for startups in the insurance space. Thirdly and most importantly, startups have the advantage of cutting-edge technology and digital tools at their disposal that enable them to conceptualize, develop and offer the products and services that customers want.

Goodbye Doc!



Tim Cook talks about Apple watch [Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOvnHEs_SfE]

There has been a huge buzz around the recent announcement of Apple watch in the wearables segment. The watch has nicely packaged social, fitness, home, health and payments into a single device. It has a number of optical sensors, which along with an accelerometer would be able to measure an individual's activity and heart rate in detail. The apple Health app, along with the new developer tool called Healthkit, provides new ways of tracking these vital parameters and promoting a healthy regimen.

There is an interesting correlation between the cost of electronic devices like camera lenses, touch glass and fingerprint readers, once they have been incorporated into a mass market mobile smartphone. Studies have shown that the cost of such devices drop faster than Moore's law once a leading smartphone (e.g. iPhone, Samsung Galaxy, etc. have adopted it). What is studied less is that this price drop could have a huge impact on adjacent markets and spawn a new range of solution offerings, which was not possible before due to the high input cost of these devices.

1

Search InfyTalk

+1 and Like InfyTalk

Subscribe to InfyTalk feed

InfyTalk VBlogs: Watch Now

Infosys on Twitter